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/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

semi-quick answers to common questions of new people

so people often ask similar questions over here and because they are getting probably kinda annoying over time to many I just try to answer as many as I find. if you have more that would fit here, add them to the comments

submitted by My1xT to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

What ever happened to mine-litecoin.com? I believe I had a thousand of coins stored there

I'm currently experiencing multi-hard drive failure, and needed a "HotSpare" drive to aid in rebuilding my storage pool. I went digging in the basement for old hard drives and came across one that apparently contains all my CryptoMining data and even the blockchains from back in 2013 that I thought I had lost.
Back then I had lost my bitcoin in the Mt. Gox fraud.. Pissed off, I quit Cryptocurrency - encrypted my bitcoin, litecoin, and dogecoin wallets with 7zip and moved them to cold storage. In 2018 when bitcoins skyrocketed - I realized I had forgot the password. But today, I found that drive, and it is NOT ENCRYPTED!! I thought I was rich!
But the reality is that every single wallet shows a balance of zero...
I distinctly remember having thousands of litecoins and dogecoins, and maybe half a bitcoin. Granted, both clients were 7+yrs behind - but so far they've synced to 4yrs and still show zero. I don't believe I would have encrypted the wallets if they were all empty? So it's odd.
My current theory is maybe I hadn't moved them from the pools they were in? I have all my old logins and passwords, but I can't find the websites to use them on or what happened to those websites.
What happened to mine-litecoin.com?
submitted by DZMBA to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

BTCPay Server Questions for key security with LN capabilities.

Read over the docs and the Getting Started with BTCPay Server post. Played around on TorProject's donation page. All in all looks really awesome. Did have a few questions on LN with BTCPay.
As the docs point out, for BTC payments, you can keep your xprv off server so you can receive payments to a cold wallet. For LN payments though, I'd imagine you have to have a hot-wallet on the BTCPay server. The docs seem to imply this as well. This would mean if I drop the ball on my firewall or BTCPi setup, that someone more clever than I could launch a remote attack and possibly empty my LND wallet.
Is there a way around this? I would imagine I have to keep an xprv in LND for it to do invoicing. But is there any way I point BTCPay to another LN node to always empty the BTCPay-LN wallet to? I guess it would need a batch of non-denominational invoices to pay-to with some real long expiration. I would think you could upload a new batch of invoices every few days. Obviously if the server ran out of back-end invoices, it would just hold funds on server.
Anyway, has this been discussed before in a PR or anything. There are likely far more elegant suggestions, but my basic idea is just to keep the BTC-LN hot wallet as empty as possible. Let it receive payments then dump them to another location that is "less-hot" with fewer open ports.

Update

Thanks for the feedback guys. I suppose I didn't really phrase my question right, so I guess that's why it missed its mark. I'm coming at it from an OPSEC view point, so from that standpoint here is my view:

Assumptions

  1. Anything with an open port accepting bind connections (aka web-server) has a risk of getting completely compromised by an attacker.
  2. Something with no open ports but still online (aka LN wallet without inbound conns) has a lower risk of getting completely compromised by an attacker.
  3. If an attacker can compromise the security of the OS, it is assumed the risk of the wallets keys being compromised is > 0.000000%
  4. If an attacker compromises the wallet private keys, they will have access to whatever funds are in the wallet both past and future.

Conclusion

Given that the a BTCPay server with LN enabled keeps an open internet port to service payment requests and keeps private keys on the server, the risk of [4] above is basically the odds of [1] times the odds of [3], both of which are > 0.00000%. So if you are at a non-zero risk of loosing previous and future payments, the rational thing to do (in my opinion) is to move funds out of the at-risk wallet. This would mean that from the point in time T of point 4, the only funds at risk would be future payments, and not past ones. Furthermore any movement of funds would signal the compromise allowing the operator to shutdown the server. So realistically the risk window would be drastically reduced.

Proposal

Given that moving funds off of the at risk wallet reduces exposure, my proposal is to move funds (via LN) from the high-risk wallet to a lower-risk wallet. Since they are LN TXNs the cost is serviceable. Although the low-risk wallet still has a risk > 0.000000%, it is still significantly lower risk than the BTCPay server since the low-risk wallet does not accept inbound connections. There are likely dozens of protocol specific ways to get this done. My suggestions was to house a collection of 1000 invoices on the BTCPay server with a 800 hour expiration. This would allow the operator to refresh the invoice collection once a month and allow the BTCPay server a collection of invoices to use to move funds from the high-risk to low-risk wallet.

Postscript

Hopefully that defines my concerns a bit more clearly.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Andreas Antonopoulos' depiction of the day he became aware of the donations that made him a millionaire

I'm not sure if this already has been posted here, but I just came across this post from A. Antonopoulos' Patreon page (it's a public entry posted on 16th of December. The readability and formatting is better there btw):
Edit: direct link to the post: https://www.patreon.com/posts/emotional-15912702
On December 6th, my life changed trajectory... again. I went to sleep on a wave of positive messages and support from the bitcoin community, in response to a letter I had posted on Patreon titled “In defense of optimism” that had leaked to Reddit. I had spent the day reading messages of support pouring in on Twitter, Patreon, and email, literally thousands of them. It was a life-affirming experience. Like everyone else on social media, the messages I receive are not always kind and supportive. Often the critical messages and trolls are far louder than the supporters. Our brains don't evaluate praise and criticism in equal measure - it's easy to believe the criticism and see the praise as undeserved. That’s why each little message of support makes a difference, each one helps me ignore the critics and see the impact of my work. In addition to all of the written messages, people were signing up to support me on Patreon and some were even sending bitcoin to my donation address. By the time I went to sleep, I was filled with gratitude, humbled by the overwhelmingly positive, viral response of the community.
Here’s what happened next...
I wake up on December 7th, the notifications list on my phone was too long to scroll. Hundreds more messages of support had come in while I was asleep.
Then my phone rings and I recognize the number of a dear friend. "Strange," I think. I’m not expecting a call. "Don't open your laptop yet," she says. "You got some big bitcoin donations overnight. Are you sitting down?" I sit down. I open my laptop, I look at the balance in my 1andreas bitcoin donation address.
Surprise, gratitude, fear, shock, joy, elation, anxiety. My emotions achieved a level of volatility that mirrored that of the bitcoin exchange rate. Good thing I was sitting down.
You're probably thinking that between the supportive messages and the large donations, I’d have been celebrating without a care in the world. But I'm a security professional who works in bitcoin. Could I come up with a doomsday scenario to taint this experience? Hold my beer.
I'm in a taxi on the way to the airport. I’m cycling through emotions again, a bit faster now.
Joy, Terror, Tears, Gratitude, Fear, Elation, Dread, Cold Sweat. It's a good thing I'm sitting down. I can't feel my fingers.
Anxiety
Wouldn't it be ironic if I get hacked and this massive donation is stolen the same day it was given? Shudder. That was a real possibility. Funds were sent to a vanity address, posted on my website, which was mainly used to support my habit of giving small amounts of bitcoin to strangers at meetups and conferences. Before December 6th, the address typically received small gifts each month and I emptied it every now and then in a spree of small donations.
Gratitude
I still can’t believe how many people have responded. I had no idea how many people could identify with the feelings expressed “In defense of optimism” and would want to show their support. I’m grateful to be a part of this community.
Fear
This vanity address is secured with a single private key which was stored on my phone in a “hot” wallet, so that I can give away bitcoin at meetups. The address has maximum public visibility and no Segwit (segregated witness) support. My security model just tipped over and I'm freaking out.
Happiness
I’m so happy! This is incredible, unimaginable. My fingers are numb, in a good way. Is this really happening?!?
Cold Sweats
I have to move the funds out. Now. Right now. But I only have this key on a wallet that doesn't handle RBF (replace-by-fee), CPFP (child-pays-for-parent), and it's not a Segwit address. I'm traveling; I’m about to get on two long flights and the mempool is slammed with transactions. Of all the days!
Joy
I’m crying. Tears of joy. This is something most people never get to experience in the most meaningful of careers, a loud acknowledgement from an entire community and financial security. I’m thinking about my family members and close friends who are struggling and overjoyed at the opportunity I now have to help them.
Terror
Then it dawns on me: a perfect nightmare scenario. What if this is considered "income" in the US and I have to pay taxes at a 39.6% rate? Those taxes would be evaluated on the USD value of the donation at the time it was made, at an all-time-high price of bitcoin. If bitcoin's bubble bursts by 50% today, I will owe more taxes than the donation is worth. I will be bankrupt but will owe the IRS and those debts can't be discharged in bankruptcy. I'm going to be in debt for a decade!
Elation
I can HODL! I don’t have to keep selling to pay bills. Patreon has grown too, so I should be able to cover my expenses and build the business with their support. I can really HODL!
[Alarm buzzes on my phone]
“Boarding on Gate D15”. Pack everything back up, run to the gate. Find my seat. Unpack all my electronics. Re-establish connections. No Wifi yet. 3G if I hold my phone just so against the window. We're taking off. No Wifi at all on this flight. 4 hours, offline, me and my thoughts. What is the opposite of a state of mindfulness? Head spinning.
Fear
What if the price crashes. Should I sell some?
Silliness
I'm buying a lambo (I laugh out loud at the thought of that. No, I'd never waste money on something so silly).
Dread
What if the donations had zero fees and will never confirm? What if this was all a cruel joke?
Joy
My dad will be so proud!
[Landed]
Turn on smartphone. Too many notifications. Turn on VPN, Tor. Sync wallet. Too slow. Too slow.
Run to the lounge. Get on Wifi. Fire up VPN, Tor. Start electrum. Import keys. Child-pays-for-parent the stuck transactions, Replace-by-fee new transactions. Careful coin selection. Send to cold storage (so glad I keep an unused cold storage address handy). Overpay fees more than ever before. 2000 satoshi per byte? Fuck yeah. This is the highest priority transaction of my life. 8 agonizing minutes. 1st block. Confirmations ripple down my screen. Exhaling... I hadn't noticed I was holding my breath.
“Boarding gate C51”. Pack everything, run to the gate. Board the plane. Unpack everything. This flight has Wifi. Bet it doesn't work. Yup, it doesn't work. 6.5 hour flight. I'll just read a book. I've read the same paragraph 8 times and don't know what it says. I'll sleep. Nope. Ok fine, I'll fret - seems I'm good at that and nothing else right now.
[Landed]
That was the longest flight ever. Boot up, 4G, VPN, Tor. Sync.... slow, too slow.
ANOTHER GIANT DONATION. WTF! Is this really happening? Is my wallet counting the balance incorrectly? This isn't possible. WTF IS GOING ON?
Joy, Terror, Tears, Gratitude, Fear, Elation, Dread. I’m cycling faster now.
I just emptied my wallet into cold storage and now it's carrying a ridiculous amount again. Boot up, VPN, Tor, Electrum, CPFP, RBF, cold sweat, 1 confirmation. Phew.
I realize that I just conducted the 4 biggest transactions of my life. I'm shaking. Hope I didn't screw anything up.
Finally I get to my hotel. “Long day” doesn’t even begin to describe it. I am grateful, giddy, jetlagged and exhausted, so sleep should come easy, right? Not happening. Two hours of tossing and turning while my mind is racing. In the end I just pass out from exhaustion. I wake up in a state of anxiety.
I open my inbox. I have a dozen interview requests from newspapers, TV, radio. They don’t want to talk about bitcoin. They want to talk about “my story.” It’s never been about “my story” and I’m not about to change that. Denied, denied, denied. That’s it. I’m going offline for a few days. I need time to process everything that has happened over the past couple of days and strategize about what to do next.
There are no words to adequately convey my appreciation, my gratitude.
These are life-changing gifts, but I don’t intend to change my life. I’m highly suspicious and careful about “lifestyle inflation”: I resist any urges to increase my spending as my income increases because as a self-employed entrepreneur I know my income can decrease significantly at any moment.
First, the practical side: For legal and tax reasons the gifts should remain mostly untouched for at least three years. This is a new situation and no one knows for sure how the authorities will characterize it. I wanted to HODL anyway, so that’s fine with me.
Second, and the much more important side, I love what I do. I’m obviously not going to “retire” or slow down. Receiving your messages and support has energized me and I’m excited to do more, much more.
The number of people supporting me on Patreon has grown significantly and with that support I’ll actually be able to do a lot more. And there are many things I want to do: a new website with more materials, in as many formats and languages as possible; more books; an epic tour; and that’s just the beginning! I also plan to grow my team, which serves two goals: I can get help for the things that need to be done, but I can also bring more people success and security with a steady paycheck.
While I’m excited about all of these new projects, I want you to know that the ultimate goal remains the same: to educate as many people as possible about this transformational technology and remain an independent voice, working directly for the community.
A week has passed. The one feeling that keeps returning, among the barrage of feelings, is gratitude. After taking time to process and calm down, the fear and stress is gone and all that is left is gratitude. I am so thankful for all the messages of support. I am so touched to hear stories of how my work has affected others in a positive way. I am thankful for all the donors who rallied behind me to help me in my advocacy and education.

THANKYOUBITCOINCOMMUNITY

Thank you for being so generous, so kind, so supportive; I’ll never forget this experience. Now, back to work!
submitted by TheGreatMuffin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

An extensive guide for cashing out bitcoin and cryptocurrencies into private banks

Hey guys.
Merry Xmas !
I am coming back to you with a follow up post, as I have helped many people cash out this year and I have streamlined the process. After my original post, I received many requests to be more specific and provide more details. I thought that after the amazing rally we have been attending over the last few months, and the volatility of the last few days, it would be interesting to revisit more extensively.
The attitude of banks around crypto is changing slowly, but it is still a tough stance. For the first partial cash out I operated around a year ago for a client, it took me months to find a bank. They wouldn’t want to even consider the case and we had to knock at each and every door. Despite all my contacts it was very difficult back in the days. This has changed now, and banks have started to open their doors, but there is a process, a set of best practices and codes one has to follow.
I often get requests from crypto guys who are very privacy-oriented, and it takes me months to have them understand that I am bound by Swiss law on banking secrecy, and I am their ally in this onboarding process. It’s funny how I have to convince people that banks are legit, while on the other side, banks ask me to show that crypto millionaires are legit. I have a solid background in both banking and in crypto so I manage to make the bridge, but yeah sometimes it is tough to reconcile the two worlds. I am a crypto enthusiast myself and I can say that after years of work in the banking industry I have grown disillusioned towards banks as well, like many of you. Still an account in a Private bank is convenient and powerful. So let’s get started.
There are two different aspects to your onboarding in a Swiss Private bank, compliance-wise.
*The origin of your crypto wealth
*Your background (residence, citizenship and probity)
These two aspects must be documented in-depth.
How to document your crypto wealth. Each new crypto millionaire has a different story. I may detail a few fun stories later in this post, but at the end of the day, most of crypto rich I have met can be categorized within the following profiles: the miner, the early adopter, the trader, the corporate entity, the black market, the libertarian/OTC buyer. The real question is how you prove your wealth is legit.
1. Context around the original amount/investment Generally speaking, your first crypto purchase may not be documented. But the context around this acquisition can be. I have had many cases where the original amount was bought through Mtgox, and no proof of purchase could be provided, nor could be documented any Mtgox claim. That’s perfectly fine. At some point Mtgox amounted 70% of the bitcoin transactions globally, and people who bought there and managed to withdraw and keep hold of their bitcoins do not have any Mtgox claim. This is absolutely fine. However, if you can show me the record of a wire from your bank to Tisbane (Mtgox's parent company) it's a great way to start.
Otherwise, what I am trying to document here is the following: I need context. If you made your first purchase by saving from summer jobs, show me a payroll. Even if it was USD 2k. If you acquired your first bitcoins from mining, show me the bills of your mining equipment from 2012 or if it was through a pool mine, give me your slushpool account ref for instance. If you were given bitcoin against a service you charged, show me an invoice.
2. Tracking your wealth until today and making sense of it. What I have been doing over the last few months was basically educating compliance officers. Thanks God, the blockchain is a global digital ledger! I have been telling my auditors and compliance officers they have the best tool at their disposal to lead a proper investigation. Whether you like it or not, your wealth can be tracked, from address to address. You may have thought all along this was a bad feature, but I am telling you, if you want to cash out, in the context of Private Banking onboarding, tracking your wealth through the block explorer is a boon. We can see the inflows, outflows. We can see the age behind an address. An early adopter who bought 1000 BTC in 2010, and let his bitcoin behind one address and held thus far is legit, whether or not he has a proof of purchase to show. That’s just common sense. My job is to explain that to the banks in a language they understand.
Let’s have a look at a few examples and how to document the few profiles I mentioned earlier.
The trader. I love traders. These are easy cases. I have a ton of respect for them. Being a trader myself in investment banks for a decade earlier in my career has taught me that controlling one’s emotions and having the discipline to impose oneself some proper risk management system is really really hard. Further, being able to avoid the exchange bankruptcy and hacks throughout crypto history is outstanding. It shows real survival instinct, or just plain blissed ignorance. In any cases traders at exchange are easy cases to corroborate since their whole track record is potentially available. Some traders I have met have automated their trading and have shown me more than 500k trades done over the span of 4 years. Obviously in this kind of scenario I don’t show everything to the bank to avoid information overload, and prefer to do some snacking here and there. My strategy is to show the early trades, the most profitable ones, explain the trading strategy and (partially expose) the situation as of now with id pages of the exchanges and current balance. Many traders have become insensitive to the risk of parking their crypto at exchange as they want to be able to trade or to grasp an occasion any minute, so they generally do not secure a substantial portion on the blockchain which tends to make me very nervous.
The early adopter. Provided that he has not mixed his coin, the early adopter or “hodler” is not a difficult case either. Who cares how you bought your first 10k btc if you bought them below 3$ ? Even if you do not have a purchase proof, I would generally manage to find ways. We just have to corroborate the original 30’000 USD investment in this case. I mainly focus on three things here:
*proof of early adoption I have managed to educate some banks on a few evidences specifically related to crypto markets. For instance with me, an old bitcointalk account can serve as a proof of early adoption. Even an old reddit post from a few years ago where you say how much you despise this Ripple premined scam can prove to be a treasure readily available to show you were early.
*story telling Compliance officers like to know when, why and how. They are human being looking for simple answers to simple questions and they don’t want like to be played fool. Telling the truth, even without a proof can do wonders, and even though bluffing might still work because banks don’t fully understand bitcoin yet, it is a risky strategy that is less and less likely to pay off as they are getting more sophisticated by the day.
*micro transaction from an old address you control This is the killer feature. Send a $20 worth transaction from an old address to my company wallet and to one of my partner bank’s wallet and you are all set ! This is gold and considered a very solid piece of evidence. You can also do a microtransaction to your own wallet, but banks generally prefer transfer to their own wallet. Patience with them please. they are still learning.
*signature message Why do a micro transaction when you can sign a message and avoid potentially tainting your coins ?
*ICO millionaire Some clients made their wealth participating in ETH crowdsale or IOTA ICO. They were very easy to deal with obviously and the account opening was very smooth since we could evidence the GENESIS TxHash flow.
The miner Not so easy to proof the wealth is legit in that case. Most early miners never took screenshot of the blocks on bitcoin core, nor did they note down the block number of each block they mined. Until the the Slashdot article from August 2010 anyone could mine on his laptop, let his computer run overnight and wake up to a freshly minted block containing 50 bitcoins back in the days. Not many people were structured enough to store and secure these coins, avoid malwares while syncing the blockchain continuously, let alone document the mined blocks in the process. What was 50 BTC worth really for the early miners ? dust of dollars, games and magic cards… Even miners post 2010 are generally difficult to deal with in terms of compliance onboarding. Many pool mining are long dead. Deepbit is down for instance and the founders are MIA. So my strategy to proof mining activity is as follow:
*Focusing on IT background whenever possible. An IT background does help a lot to bring some substance to the fact you had the technical ability to operate a mining rig.
*Showing mining equipment receipts. If you mined on your own you must have bought the hardware to do so. For instance mining equipment receipts from butterfly lab from 2012-2013 could help document your case. Similarly, high electricity bill from your household on a consistent basis back in the day could help. I have already unlocked a tricky case in the past with such documents when the bank was doubtful.
*Wallet.dat files with block mining transactions from 2011 thereafter This obviously is a fantastic piece of evidence for both you and me if you have an old wallet and if you control an address that received original mined blocks, (even if the wallet is now empty). I will make sure compliance officers understand what it means, and as for the early adopter, you can prove your control over these wallet through a microtransaction. With these kind of addresses, I can show on the block explorer the mined block rewards hitting at regular time interval, and I can even spot when difficulty level increased or when halvening process happened.
*Poolmining account. Here again I have educated my partner bank to understand that a slush account opened in 2013 or an OnionTip presence was enough to corroborate mining activity. The block explorer then helps me to do the bridge with your current wallet.
*Describing your set up and putting it in context In the history of mining we had CPU, GPU, FPG and ASICs mining. I will describe your technical set up and explain why and how your set up was competitive at that time.
The corporate entity Remember 2012 when we were all convinced bitcoin would take over the world, and soon everyone would pay his coffee in bitcoin? How naïve we were to think transaction fees would remain low forever. I don’t blame bitcoin cash supporters; I once shared this dream as well. Remember when we thought global adoption was right around the corner and some brick and mortar would soon accept bitcoin transaction as a common mean of payment? Well, some shop actually did accept payment and held. I had a few cases as such of shops holders, who made it to the multi million mark holding and had invoices or receipts to proof the transactions. If you are organized enough to keep a record for these trades and are willing to cooperate for the documentation, you are making your life easy. The digital advertising business is also a big market for the bitcoin industry, and affiliates partner compensated in btc are common. It is good to show an invoice, it is better to show a contract. If you do not have a contract (which is common since all advertising deals are about ticking a check box on the website to accept terms and conditions), there are ways around that. If you are in that case, pm me.
The black market Sorry guys, I can’t do much for you officially. Not that I am judging you. I am a libertarian myself. It’s just already very difficult to onboard legit btc adopters, so the black market is a market I cannot afford to consider. My company is regulated so KYC and compliance are key for me if I want to stay in business. Behind each case I push forward I am risking the credibility and reputation I have built over the years. So I am sorry guys I am not risking it to make an extra buck. Your best hope is that crypto will eventually take over the world and you won’t need to cash out anyway. Or go find a Lithuanian bank that is light on compliance and cooperative.
The OTC buyer and the libertarian. Generally a very difficult case. If you bought your stack during your journey in Japan 5 years ago to a guy you never met again; or if you accumulated on https://localbitcoins.com/ and kept no record or lost your account, it is going to be difficult. Not impossible but difficult. We will try to build a case with everything else we have, and I may be able to onboard you. However I am risking a lot here so I need to be 100% confident you are legit, before I defend you. Come & see me in Geneva, and we will talk. I will run forensic services like elliptic, chainalysis, or scorechain on an extract of your wallet. If this scan does not raise too many red flags, then maybe we can work together ! If you mixed your coins all along your crypto history, and shredded your seeds because you were paranoid, or if you made your wealth mining professionally monero over the last 3 years but never opened an account at an exchange. ¯_(ツ)_/¯ I am not a magician and don’t get me wrong, I love monero, it’s not the point.
Cashing out ICOs Private companies or foundations who have ran an ICO generally have a very hard time opening a bank account. The few banks that accept such projects would generally look at 4 criteria:
*Seriousness of the project Extensive study of the whitepaper to limit the reputation risk
*AML of the onboarding process ICOs 1.0 have no chance basically if a background check of the investors has not been conducted
*Structure of the moral entity List of signatories, certificate of incumbency, work contract, premises...
*Fiscal conformity Did the company informed the authorities and seek a fiscal ruling.
For the record, I am not into the tax avoidance business, so people come to me with a set up and I see if I can make it work within the legal framework imposed to me.
First, stop thinking Switzerland is a “offshore heaven” Swiss banks have made deals with many governments for the exchange of fiscal information. If you are a French citizen, resident in France and want to open an account in a Private Bank in Switzerland to cash out your bitcoins, you will get slaughtered (>60%). There are ways around that, and I could refer you to good tax specialists for fiscal optimization, but I cannot organize it myself. It would be illegal for me. Swiss private banks makes it easy for you to keep a good your relation with your retail bank and continue paying your bills without headaches. They are integrated to SEPA, provide ebanking and credit cards.
For information, these are the kind of set up some of my clients came up with. It’s all legal; obviously I do not onboard clients that are not tax compliant. Further disclaimer: I did not contribute myself to these set up. Do not ask me to organize it for you. I won’t.
EU tricks
Swiss lump sum taxation Foreign nationals resident in Switzerland can be taxed on a lump-sum basis if they are not gainfully employed in our country. Under the lump-sum tax regime, foreign nationals taking residence in Switzerland may choose to pay an expense-based tax instead of ordinary income and wealth tax. Attractive cantons for the lump sum taxation are Zug, Vaud, Valais, Grisons, Lucerne and Berne. To make it short, you will be paying somewhere between 200 and 400k a year and all expenses will be deductible.
Switzerland has adopted a very friendly attitude towards crypto currency in general. There is a whole crypto valley in Zug now. 30% of ICOs are operated in Switzerland. The reason is that Switzerland has thrived for centuries on banking secrecy, and today with FATCA and exchange of fiscal info with EU, banking secrecy is dead. Regulators in Switzerland have understood that digital ledger technologies were a way to roll over this competitive advantage for the generations to come. Switzerland does not tax capital gains on crypto profits. The Finma has a very pragmatic approach. They have issued guidance- updated guidelines here. They let the business get organized and operate their analysis on a case per case basis. Only after getting a deep understanding of the market will they issue a global fintech license in 2019. This approach is much more realistic than legislations which try to regulate everything beforehand.
Italy new tax exemption. It’s a brand new fiscal exemption. Go to Aoste, get residency and you could be taxed a 100k/year for 10years. Yes, really.
Portugal What’s crazy in Europe is the lack of fiscal harmonization. Even if no one in Brussels dares admit it, every other country is doing fiscal dumping. Portugal is such a country and has proved very friendly fiscally speaking. I personally have a hard time trusting Europe. I have witnessed what happened in Greece over the last few years. Some of our ultra high net worth clients got stuck with capital controls. I mean no way you got out of crypto to have your funds confiscated at the next financial crisis! Anyway. FYI
Malta Generally speaking, if you get a residence somewhere you have to live there for a certain period of time. Being stuck in Italy is no big deal with Schengen Agreement, but in Malta it is a different story. In Malta, the ordinary residence scheme is more attractive than the HNWI residence scheme. Being an individual, you can hold a residence permit under this scheme and pay zero income tax in Malta in a completely legal way.
Monaco Not suitable for French citizens, but for other Ultra High Net worth individual, Monaco is worth considering. You need an account at a local bank as a proof of fortune, and this account generally has to be seeded with at least EUR500k. You also need a proof of residence. I do mean UHNI because if you don’t cash out minimum 30m it’s not interesting. Everything is expensive in Monaco. Real Estate is EUR 50k per square meter. A breakfast at Monte Carlo Bay hotel is 70 EUR. Monaco is sunny but sometimes it feels like a golden jail. Do you really want that for your kids?
Dubaï
  1. Set up a company in Dubaï, get your resident card.
  2. Spend one day every 6 month there
  3. ???
  4. Be tax free
US tricks Some Private banks in Geneva do have the license to manage the assets of US persons and U.S citizens. However, do not think it is a way to avoid paying taxes in the US. Opening an account at an authorized Swiss Private banks is literally the same tax-wise as opening an account at Fidelity or at Bank of America in the US. The only difference is that you will avoid all the horror stories. Horror stories are all real by the way. In Switzerland, if you build a decent case and answer all the questions and corroborate your case in depth, you will manage to convince compliance officers beforehand. When the money eventually hits your account, it is actually available and not frozen.
The IRS and FATCA require to file FBAR if an offshore account is open. However FBAR is a reporting requirement and does not have taxes related to holding an account outside the US. The taxes would be the same if the account was in the US. However penalties for non compliance with FBAR are very large. The tax liability management is actually performed through the management of the assets ( for exemple by maximizing long term capital gains and minimizing short term gains).
The case for Porto Rico. Full disclaimer here. I am not encouraging this. Have not collaborated on such tax avoidance schemes. if you are interested I strongly encourage you to seek a tax advisor and get a legal opinion. I am not responsible for anything written below. I am not going to say much because I am so afraid of uncle Sam that I prefer to humbly pass the hot potato to pwc From here all it takes is a good advisor and some creativity to be tax free on your crypto wealth if you are a US person apparently. Please, please please don’t ask me more. And read the disclaimer again.
Trust tricks Generally speaking I do not accept fringe fiscal situation because it puts me in a difficult situation to the banks I work with, and it is already difficult enough to defend a legit crypto case. Trust might be a way to optimize your fiscal situation. Belize. Bahamas. Seychelles. Panama, You name it. At the end of the day, what matters for Swiss Banks are the beneficial owner and the settlor. Get a legal opinion, get it done, and when you eventually knock at a private bank’s door, don’t say it was for fiscal avoidance you stupid ! You will get the door smashed upon you. Be smarter. It will work. My advice is just to have it done by a great tax specialist lawyer, even if it costs you some money, as the entity itself needs to be structured in a professional way. Remember that with trust you are dispossessing yourself off your wealth. Not something to be taken lightly.
“Anonymous” cash out. Right. I think I am not going into this topic, neither expose the ways to get it done. Pm me for details. I already feel a bit uncomfortable with all the info I have provided. I am just going to mention many people fear that crypto exchange might become reporting entities soon, and rightly so. This might happen anyday. You have been warned. FYI, this only works for non-US and large cash out.
The difference between traders an investors. Danmark, Holland and Germany all make a huge difference if you are a passive investor or if you are a trader. ICO is considered investing for instance and is not taxed, while trading might be considered as income and charged aggressively. I would try my best to protect you and put a focus on your investor profile whenever possible, so you don't have to pay 52% tax if you do not have to :D
Full cash out or partial cash out? People who have been sitting on crypto for long have grown an emotional and irrational link with their coins. They come to me and say, look, I have 50m in crypto but I would like to cash out 500k only. So first let me tell you that as a wealth manager my advice to you is to take some off the table. Doing a partial cash out is absolutely fine. The market is bullish. We are witnessing a redistribution of wealth at a global scale. Bitcoin is the real #occupywallstreet, and every one will discuss crypto at Xmas eve which will make the market even more supportive beginning 2018, especially with all hedge funds entering the scene. If you want to stay exposed to bitcoin and altcoins, and believe these techs will change the world, it’s just natural you want to keep some coins. In the meantime, if you have lived off pizzas over the last years, and have the means to now buy yourself an nice house and have an account at a private bank, then f***ing do it mate ! Buy physical gold with this account, buy real estate, have some cash at hands. Even though US dollar is worthless to your eyes, it’s good and convenient to have some. Also remember your wife deserves it ! And if you have no wife yet and you are socially awkward like the rest of us, then maybe cashing out partially will help your situation ;)
What the Private Banks expect. Joke aside, it is important you understand something. If you come around in Zurich to open a bank account and partially cash out, just don’t expect Private Banks will make an exception for you if you are small. You can’t ask them to facilitate your cash out, buy a 1m apartment with the proceeds of the sale, and not leave anything on your current account. It won’t work. Sadly, under 5m you are considered small in private banking. The bank is ok to let you open an account, provided that your kyc and compliance file are validated, but they will also want you to become a client and leave some money there to invest. This might me despicable, but I am just explaining you their rules. If you want to cash out, you should sell enough to be comfortable and have some left. Also expect the account opening to last at least 3-4 week if everything goes well. You can't just open an account overnight.
The cash out logistics. Cashing out 1m USD a day in bitcoin or more is not so hard.
Let me just tell you this: Even if you get a Tier 4 account with Kraken and ask Alejandro there to raise your limit over $100k per day, Even if you have a bitfinex account and you are willing to expose your wealth there, Even if you have managed to pass all the crazy due diligence at Bitstamp,
The amount should be fractioned to avoid risking your full wealth on exchange and getting slaughtered on the price by trading big quantities. Cashing out involves significant risks at all time. There is a security risk of compromising your keys, a counterparty risk, a fat finger risk. Let it be done by professionals. It is worth every single penny.
Most importantly, there is a major difference between trading on an exchange and trading OTC. Even though it’s not publicly disclosed some exchange like Kraken do have OTC desks. Trading on an exchange for a large amount will weight on the prices. Bitcoin is a thin market. In my opinion over 30% of the coins are lost in translation forever. Selling $10m on an exchange in a day can weight on the prices more than you’d think. And if you trade on a exchange, everything is shown on record, and you might wipe out the prices because on exchanges like bitstamp or kraken ultimately your counterparties are retail investors and the market depth is not huge. It is a bit better on Bitfinex. It is way better to trade OTC. Accessing the institutional OTC market is not easy, and that is also the reason why you should ask a regulated financial intermediary if we are talking about huge amounts.
Last point, always chose EUR as opposed to USD. EU correspondent banks won’t generally block institutional amounts. However we had the cases of USD funds frozen or delayed by weeks.
Most well-known OTC desks are Cumberlandmining (ask for Lucas), Genesis (ask for Martin), Bitcoin Suisse AG (ask for Niklas), circletrade, B2C2, or Altcoinomy (ask for Olivier)
Very very large whales can also set up escrow accounts for massive block trades. This world, where blocks over 30k BTC are exchanged between 2 parties would deserve a reddit thread of its own. Crazyness all around.
Your options: DIY or going through a regulated financial intermediary.
Execution trading is a job in itself. You have to be patient, be careful not to wipe out the order book and place limit orders, monitor the market intraday for spikes or opportunities. At big levels, for a large cash out that may take weeks, these kind of details will save you hundred thousands of dollars. I understand crypto holders are suspicious and may prefer to do it by themselves, but there are regulated entities who now offer the services. Besides, being a crypto millionaire is not a guarantee you will get institutional daily withdrawal limits at exchange. You might, but it will take you another round of KYC with them, and surprisingly this round might be even more aggressive that the ones at Private banks since exchange have gone under intense scrutiny by regulators lately.
The fees for cashing out through a regulated financial intermediary to help you with your cash out should be around 1-2% flat on the nominal, not more. And for this price you should get the full package: execution/monitoring of the trades AND onboarding in a private bank. If you are asked more, you are being abused.
Of course, you also have the option to do it yourself. It is a way more tedious and risky process. Compliance with the exchange, compliance with the private bank, trading BTC/fiat, monitoring the transfers…You will save some money but it will take you some time and stress. Further, if you approach a private bank directly, it will trigger a series of red flag to the banks. As I said in my previous post, they call a direct approach a “walk-in”. They will be more suspicious than if you were introduced by someone and won’t hesitate to show you high fees and load your portfolio with in-house products that earn more money to the banks than to you. Remember also most banks still do not understand crypto so you will have a lot of explanations to provide and you will have to start form scratch with them!
The paradox of crypto millionaires Most of my clients who made their wealth through crypto all took massive amount of risks to end up where they are. However, most of them want their bank account to be managed with a low volatility fixed income capital preservation risk profile. This is a paradox I have a hard time to explain and I think it is mainly due to the fact that most are distrustful towards banks and financial markets in general. Many clients who have sold their crypto also have a cash-out blues in the first few months. This is a classic situation. The emotions involved in hodling for so long, the relief that everything has eventually gone well, the life-changing dynamics, the difficulties to find a new motivation in life…All these elements may trigger a post cash-out depression. It is another paradox of the crypto rich who has every card in his hand to be happy, but often feel a bit sad and lonely. Sometimes, even though it’s not my job, I had to do some psychological support. A lot of clients have also become my friends, because we have the same age and went through the same “ordeal”. First world problem I know… Remember, cashing out is not the end. It’s actually the beginning. Don’t look back, don’t regret. Cash out partially, because it does not make sense to cash out in full, regret it and want back in. relax.
The race to cash out crypto billionaire and the concept of late exiter. The Winklevoss brothers are obviously the first of a series. There will be crypto billionaires. Many of them. At a certain level you can have a whole family office working for you to manage your assets and take care of your needs . However, let me tell you it’s is not because you made it so big that you should think you are a genius and know everything better than anyone. You should hire professionals to help you. Managing assets require some education around the investment vehicles and risk management strategies. Sorry guys but with all the respect I have for wallstreebet, AMD and YOLO stock picking, some discipline is necessary. The investors who have made money through crypto are generally early adopters. However I have started to see another profile popping up. They are not early adopters. They are late exiters. It is another way but just as efficient. Last week I met the first crypto millionaire I know who first bough bitcoin over 1000$. 55k invested at the beginning of this year. Late adopter & late exiter is a route that can lead to the million.
Last remarks. I know banks, bankers, and FIAT currencies are so last century. I know some of you despise them and would like to have them burn to the ground. With compliance officers taking over the business, I would like to start the fire myself sometimes. I hope this extensive guide has helped some of you. I am around if you need more details. I love my job despite all my frustration towards the banking industry because it makes me meet interesting people on a daily basis. I am a crypto enthusiast myself, and I do think this tech is here to stay and will change the world. Banks will have to adapt big time. Things have started to change already; they understand the threat is real. I can feel the generational gap in Geneva, with all these old bankers who don’t get what’s going on. They glaze at the bitcoin chart on CNBC in disbelief and they start to get it. This bitcoin thing is not a joke. Deep inside, as an early adopter who also intends to be a late exiter, as a libertarian myself, it makes me smile with satisfaction.
Cheers. @swisspb on telegram
submitted by Swissprivatebanker to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BTCPay Server Questions for key security with LN capabilities.

Read over the docs and the Getting Started with BTCPay Server post. Played around on TorProject's donation page. All in all looks really awesome. Did have a few questions on LN with BTCPay.
As the docs point out, for BTC payments, you can keep your xprv off server so you can receive payments to a cold wallet. For LN payments though, I'd imagine you have to have a hot-wallet on the BTCPay server. The docs seem to imply this as well. This would mean if I drop the ball on my firewall or BTCPi setup, that someone more clever than I could launch a remote attack and possibly empty my LND wallet.
Is there a way around this? I would imagine I have to keep an xprv in LND for it to do invoicing. But is there any way I point BTCPay to another LN node to always empty the BTCPay-LN wallet to? I guess it would need a batch of non-denominational invoices to pay-to with some real long expiration. I would think you could upload a new batch of invoices every few days. Obviously if the server ran out of back-end invoices, it would just hold funds on server.
Anyway, has this been discussed before in a PR or anything. There are likely far more elegant suggestions, but my basic idea is just to keep the BTC-LN hot wallet as empty as possible. Let it receive payments then dump them to another location that is "less-hot" with fewer open ports.

Update

Thanks for the feedback guys. I suppose I didn't really phrase my question right, so I guess that's why it missed its mark. I'm coming at it from an OPSEC view point, so from that standpoint here is my view:

Assumptions

  1. Anything with an open port accepting bind connections (aka web-server) has a risk of getting completely compromised by an attacker.
  2. Something with no open ports but still online (aka LN wallet without inbound conns) has a lower risk of getting completely compromised by an attacker.
  3. If an attacker can compromise the security of the OS, it is assumed the risk of the wallets keys being compromised is > 0.000000%
  4. If an attacker compromises the wallet private keys, they will have access to whatever funds are in the wallet both past and future.

Conclusion

Given that the a BTCPay server with LN enabled keeps an open internet port to service payment requests and keeps private keys on the server, the risk of [4] above is basically the odds of [1] times the odds of [3], both of which are > 0.00000%. So if you are at a non-zero risk of loosing previous and future payments, the rational thing to do (in my opinion) is to move funds out of the at-risk wallet. This would mean that from the point in time T of point 4, the only funds at risk would be future payments, and not past ones. Furthermore any movement of funds would signal the compromise allowing the operator to shutdown the server. So realistically the risk window would be drastically reduced.

Proposal

Given that moving funds off of the at risk wallet reduces exposure, my proposal is to move funds (via LN) from the high-risk wallet to a lower-risk wallet. Since they are LN TXNs the cost is serviceable. Although the low-risk wallet still has a risk > 0.000000%, it is still significantly lower risk than the BTCPay server since the low-risk wallet does not accept inbound connections. There are likely dozens of protocol specific ways to get this done. My suggestions was to house a collection of 1000 invoices on the BTCPay server with a 800 hour expiration. This would allow the operator to refresh the invoice collection once a month and allow the BTCPay server a collection of invoices to use to move funds from the high-risk to low-risk wallet.

Postscript

Hopefully that defines my concerns a bit more clearly.
submitted by brianddk to lightningnetwork [link] [comments]

I Created a Custom Lightning Payment Jackpot Website from Scratch, This Is What I Learnt

TL;DR: I wanted to learn how the Lightning Network operates. So I came up with an idea for a jackpot site using the Lightning Network to handle micro-payments. Operating a Lightning node is complicated and challenging for a beginner. Using custodial wallets like Wallet of Satoshi, BlueWallet or Breez is easy to use but not your keys. Please come by and help me test my Lightning integrated new website. I’m happy to help anyone that’s new to Lightning setup a wallet and play a game. It all helps with learning and adoption, that’s why we’re all here! Long Bitcoin, Short the Bankers!

Introduction: Welcome to a brand new concept in random number seeding. Generating a truly random number is quite hard. You could use the current time, divided by the RPM spin of your hard disk, squared by the temperature of your CPU, and so on. Other extreme methods include measuring quantum fluctuations in a vacuum, see ANU Quantum Random Number. All these methods are fine but none of these are really verifiable by a 3rd party. Whoever running the system can change the outcome. I'm not saying they do, simply stating that if the payoff was great enough to alter the 'reported' outcome they could. So what's different here? We're using the Bitcoin blockchain itself as the arbitrator. Every outcome is not only provably fair but verifiably fair and immutable. Trying to cheat this system is impossible.

So that’s the pitch. Make a website using the idea of whoever’s guess is closest, wins the jackpot; using Lightning to handle all the incoming and outgoing payments. I started to look around at other fully functional websites offering Lightning as a payment method. It turns out most use a 3rd party like OpenNode or CoinGate. To me, this defeats the whole purpose of Bitcoin. Why build a website/offer a service/offer Lightning as a payment method if you don’t even own or control your funds. A payment processor could simply turn off withdrawals and it’s over. Not your keys, not your coins!

It’s been quite a learning experience for me. I think the most frustrating thing to figure out and attempt to solve was channel capacity. For example, with a fresh new wallet setup on Bitcoin Lightning for Andriod (blue bolt logo), you can open a channel to anyone fine, but trying to receive money won’t work. I think for a beginneadoption this is the greatest hurdle to understand/overcome.
You need to spend money so the other side has some collateral to send back. One explanation I read was, opening Lightning channels are like a full glass of water, I need to tip some of my water into your empty glass so my glass has some room to fill it back up, it can’t overflow. Another one is like beads on a string. The number of beads is up to you but if all the beads are on your side, the other party can’t push any beats your way because you have them all. There’s ways to fix this. Either spend into the channel or buy incoming channel capacity. On the spend side, you can use websites like lightningconductor.net which allow you to send money to their Lightning node, from your new channel, and they’ll send the coins to your on-chain Bitcoin wallet. This is a simple way to empty your glass or push those beads to the other side and still retain all your money, minus LN and on-chain fees. For incoming capacity, you can use LNBig and get 400k satoshis of incoming capacity for free or lightningto.me, or you can pay lightningpowerusers.com or bitrefill.com to open larger capacity channels to you for a small fee.

For a beginner or someone new to Bitcoin/Lightning, using a custodial wallet like BlueWallet, Wallet of Satosh or Breez is far easier than trying to setup channels and buy or massage incoming capacity. You can simply install the application and using lightningconductor.net BTC to LN you can send some Bitcoin and they’ll forward it on to your lightning wallet, for a fee. These custodial wallets accept incoming transactions of 1 million satoshis or more. So now you’ve got a working wallet that’s got a few thousand satoshis, keep reading!

How to play: Two things are verifiable on the blockchain, time between blocks and transactions included in that block. First choose which block#, by default it will be the next one coming up. Then choose a public alias, others will be able to see your bets but they won’t know if you’ve paid or not, only you can see that. Next, guess the time it will take to mine the next Bitcoin or the number of transactions in that block. You can make multiple guesses. If you want to place a number of spread bets, I suggest opening a spreadsheet and getting it to generate the times or transactions for you. For example, put in 2300, then 2350, 2375, 2400, then drag down to generate as many in the sequence as you want. You can bet a maximum of 25 per invoice. This will hopefully ensure the small transaction amount will be successful. Once you’ve generated an invoice, pay it from the QR code or the lightning bolt11 string.
Now you’re ready to go. Wait till the next block goes active or the block you’ve bet on and you’ll see your bets and everyone else’s. Most importantly, what the final jackpot is. Unpaid invoices are discarded. If the block rolls over while you’re making up your mind the page will refresh and you could lose your input. Please plan your bets in notepad or a spreadsheet. I know this is annoying but I never claimed to be a UX codedesigner! It was a struggle getting all the css, ajax and javascript working, ahhhrrrrggg!! Next is the interesting part as this game can become competitive.

Game theory: As others make bets, you can encapsulate theirs. For example, they guess 2750 transactions, you can bet 2749 and 2751. While at first this seems unfair, what it doesn't show is what bets have been paid for and what have not. Only you can see your own bets that are paid and unpaid. To everyone else they look like paid bets. Only when the next block/jackpot starts can you see what's been paid for as unpaid bets are discarded. By placing dummy bets, unpaid, you can sucker someone in and greatly increase the jackpot payout at no cost to yourself. You can also use the same alias, for example, open up two different browsers, one for real bets and one for fake bets. This is why there’s a 25 bet limit, I don’t want people going too crazy with this. You can check your bets in the footer bar under ‘previous bets’. Also, IMPORTANT, please keep track of your account number at the top. If your session or browser has a problem, you can lose access to your bets and jackpot winnings. If this happens and you receive a new account number, simple use the claim jackpot in the footer to claim your winning jackpot. If you don’t have this, I can’t help you if something goes wrong. Rather than having a login/password system you have a unique account id. Don’t lose it! Now back to the blockchain.

What a minute… I though it took 10 minutes to confirm a block? Not always, actually it does this very rarely. If you average out every block over time, it averages around ten minutes. A block is confirmed when a miner takes transactions from the memory pool, up to ~1.2mb worth. Next, now this is the hard part, they need to generate a hash for that block, but it needs to start with X number of leading zeros. To achieve this, they use a random number called a nonce to seed/salt the hash and hopefully, it contains X number of zeros at the start of the block hash. If not, discard and keep trying. The winning block contains the miners local time, which can sometimes be wrong. This is why sometimes you get negative block times. See block #180966 then the next block, #180967's time stamp is before the first one! Who cares, as long as the later block references the previous block to keep the chain intact. You can’t guess negative numbers but you can guess 0 seconds. Which I guess is like betting on the green zero in roulette.

Ready to play?
Each bet is worth 5,000 satoshis. I wanted it to be expensive enough to prevent spam and also the jackpots be large enough that it would be worth playing. I hope you have fun.
Website is https://blockwisdom.com
My Twitter handle is @nixdice
If you have any questions or issues, please contact me here or on Twitter I’ll try my best to sort it out quickly.
submitted by nixdice to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Butters lose their minds when trying to defend Bitcoin's energy use

It would be hilarious if it wasn't so sad.
Here are some examples.
Currently Bitcoin mining consumes around 40,000,000 MW, which is roughly 0.2% of the world’s energy production. In the future it may consume around 10–20% of the world’s energy production, at least a 100x multiple from here, at the same time as supporting the world’s $80tn global economy, which is also a order of magnitude of 100 from where we are today.
Nope, I don't see any problem here!
Here's another genius:
In the hunt for cheap energy sources, we will unlock greater economic abundance in the real world. Bitcoin, through the harnessing of these new or disparate energy sources, not only moves us forward to a Kardeshev Type I economy but may bring us closer to a Kardeshev Type I energy civilization (We’re ~0.72 on the Kardashev Scale). With Bitcoin mining as an incentive, it may shrink the time we get to T1 from 200 years to less than a few decades. After reaching Type I status, there is less of a need to restrict the growth of energy consumption, which increases the standard of living for everyone.
Or, the glass is half empty, that white powder in your nose will lose its effect soon after writing this article, and we actually accelerate global warming to win a prize in a zero-sum game created by a speculative bubble that hasn't fallen apart yet because it's very easy to use for scams. Anyway, I'm an optimist so I'm planning on going out tomorrow and rolling coal with my SUV, to incentivize cleaner fuels. I predict that by rolling coal, I will help bring about the singularity. WHAT YOU GONNA DO ABOUT IT HUH, LIBCUCK STATIST SCUM?
Oh wait, how stupid of me. Bitcoin doesn't use enough electricity to bring us forward as a species. The banking industry uses far more electricity than bitcoin and actually accomplishes more than 3 transactions per second with it! This can mean only one thing: The banks are bringing us closer to a Kardeshev Type I energy civilization!
According to the article that trigger this discussion, Bitcoin annual Twh consumption is 28.67 , so currently more than 3 times more efficient than a very conservative calculation of the cost of the global banking system. Of course you will argue that the banking systems does more than handling a currency which is true but the difference is large enough that I do not think is that relevant. Even if only 30% of banks electricity consumption was the comparable part to Bitcoin, that will still make Bitcoin more efficient.
If we're comparing the entire banking industry to Bitcoin, are you including the tulip bulb container err hardware wallet I need to "be my own bank"? Are you including the full nodes we need to run 24/7 to serve as hubs on the lightning network? Are you including the servers of the big trading exchanges? Are you including the hundreds of people who work as customer support for the average big exchange? Are you including the Bitcoin ATM's where people can launder their cash? Are you including the data centers that run behind online wallets?
Calculating branch consumption is more tricky since there are lots of things to take into account like size of the branch or number of employees as well as several things consuming electricity like lights, cooling, computers, monitors, etc. And they are not open 24 x 365 so after looking at a couple of articles, I have decided to settle for a conservative number 10 kwh per branch assuming an average branch has 10 light bulbs, two air conditioning units that are only use 20% of the time and 12 desktop computers running an average of 12 hours a day, 20 days a month through the year.
Customer service peasants (subhuman plebs who can't code) work in the dark at 2AM in India without air conditioning to check your passport, this is how Bitcoin saves money compared to the banking industry.
Another expert suggests that perhaps people just like to stare at a blockchain, as if it were a work of art!
My point is that understanding the nature of proof-of-work and the incentives of mining valid blocks, as well as the security properties and thus the value of proof-of-work, might help to shift the perspective from “energy wasted” to “energy used for creating something valuable”. Most people value beautiful marble statues. A rising number of people value a chain of valid blocks.
I'm personally guessing people like staring at a blockchain because they imagine they're sitting on a pile of money without contributing to society, but what do I know.
Bitcoin Uses a Lot of Energy, But Gold Mining Uses More
One speculative bubble fueled by the greed of antisocial libertarians consumes more energy than another bubble fueled by the greed of antisocial libertarians. Perhaps we should consider investing money in projects that actually accomplish something, rather than buying tokens to hoard. I heard the exotic uncontacted tribe of almost anyone who's not an antisocial libertarian invests in this manner. I also heard you have more money today if you bought 1000 dollar worth of an index fund fifty years ago than 1000 dollar worth of gold, but perhaps society will collapse soon because of bitcoin mining induced global warming and your pile of gold/bitcoin will make you the village chief of a post-apocalyptic nightmare when everyone else's stock portfolio goes to zero.
submitted by yourasiansidekick to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Reasoned speculation on what's going on (no hack, exit scam garbage)

UPDATE (2 hours after OP): NiceHash just confirmed that they have indeed been hacked. This post is now obsolete.
Full response from NiceHash: https://www.reddit.com/NiceHash/comments/7i0s6o/official_press_release_statement_by_nicehash/
For future readers: Contrary to what I thought would have been a proper announcement from NiceHash in case of a suspected security breach, something along the lines of "we are currently investigating a potential security breach", they advertised it as routine maintenance on their social media accounts.
I still stand by the opinion that based on what little evidence we had, an internal screwup was the most logical conclusion. However, it does make you wonder... if this is how a business reacts to a major security breach, not alerting their users in the slightest for 12+ hours, how likely is it that they will be trustworthy in the future?
With this, I'll leave you to read the original post, as can be found below.
I (like many others) have been closely watching this subreddit and NH's social media over the past couple hours to try and figure out what the hell is going on.
Most of it is just wild speculation and doesn't really get anyone anywhere, so I thought I'd share what we know for sure so far and what it may or may not mean. So yes, there will be a bit speculation, but not wild.
  1. There will be an update soon: https://i.redditmedia.com/2GoR3J2tnSOB0ckhTmJxyMFpS7JaeATM4cnypWnaxmY.png?w=661&s=d3d7c7b6256f418b81bce60da9b1aa18 Originally posted by vrvana here: https://www.reddit.com/NiceHash/comments/7hzpy9/so_did_nicehash_get_hacked_or_is_it_just_down/dquzwlu/
  2. NH's main wallet emptied: https://bitinfocharts.com/bitcoin/address/33dH7xpzrQG8ydZvtjZ387VzkRVVXRZNgF Posted by xanhugh (and probably others) here: https://www.reddit.com/NiceHash/comments/7hxxp3/hicehash_hacked/dquq0y0/
So all we really know is their main wallet has sent funds to another one with an unknown owner, and they will update us on the situation soon™.
What we DON'T know is who the funds were transferred to, and why the funds were transferred.
Hacked?
The prevalent theory seems to be that a hacker (or multiple) stole the money and transferred them to their account.
However, based on NH's response, I doubt this is true. If I operated a business of comparable scale and had my operation hacked and completely drained of all resources, I wouldn't pretend to know what's going on by putting it into maintenance mode.
Because then this is what happens. Reddit goes nuts and people get ready with their pitchforks. Because if there's one thing in the entire world that gets people more upset than losing money, it's being 90% sure you've lost money, but still having that small hope it may still be there. Because then, whenever you actually find out you DID, in fact, lose money, the actual upset is much bigger than if you had known it from the start.
Also, if they really did get hacked and lost all their money, they've been working with BTC long enough to know that there's nothing they can do. There would be absolutely no way in hell they could recover the funds, so there would be no need to try everything, since there's nothing to try.
In conclusion: Getting hacked would give them zero incentive to play it cool. It would give them all the incentive to just admit it. Whether or not they immediately own up to getting hacked has no influence on their career as a business: it's over regardless.
Exit Scam?
Instead of discussing this myself, I'll quote the post of kinsmore who explained it much more beautifully than I ever could. The full post is here: https://www.reddit.com/NiceHash/comments/7hykcu/any_info_on_the_owners_of_nicehash_where_do_they/dquszm8/
Nicehash has been in this market since 2014, and are making an insane amount of money right now. That would be like a bank teller deciding to steal all the cash on hand 3 years into their job where they were recommended to be branch manager soon. It doesn't make any sense, exit scams happen, but generally not to successful, well paying, well setup businesses (which nicehash is)
The other possibility
To me personally, the only thing that would explain everything, the mysterious maintenance, the transferred funds, and the lack of updates from NH is this: They colossally messed up.
Something must've gone terribly wrong during those earlier maintenances where the site itself was up, but certain functions were disabled or not working properly. I have two theories on what exactly could've happened:
  1. They were implementing something new and screwed up.
  2. The company/technology behind their servers/services messed something up.
What exactly, I don't know. But what I've experienced during their earlier maintenances makes this seem all the more plausible.
I don't know about you, but I for one was able to place orders & change prices sometimes, even though I felt like I shouldn't have been able to, during their earlier maintenances. It's possible that while the price change may have gone through, it was logged incorrectly and someone got billed/paid more/less than they should have.
Why transfer all the funds to a different wallet? You may ask. Couple of possible reasons:
  1. They've requested help from outside because they can't handle the situation themselves, but obviously don't want them to be able to snatch a boatload of bitcoins while fixing an issue. This would also explain the lack of updates, since NH wouldn't even know what's happening in this scenario.
  2. They're completely wiping the server and need the funds to be safe.
  3. Something's actually wrong with the service's logic, and they want to prevent it from accidentally sending out funds it isn't meant to send out.
In conclusion: A colossal fuckup is the only thing, from my perspective, that explains the mysterious maintenance, the lack of updates, and the transfer of funds. While it's easy to say they've exit scammed or been hacked, it really just doesn't make a lot of sense if you take everything into account. Pretending to do maintenance doesn't help your dying business if you've been hacked, and exit scamming right now would be the dumbest thing since solar roadways considering all the current (and future) profits they'd miss out on.
TL;DR: Exit scam & hack don't make sense, my bet is on a screwup on their end.
submitted by xNaXDy to NiceHash [link] [comments]

[ELI5] How to send coins using Coinb.in

How to send coins from ANY wallet using https://coinb.in/#settings

Why?

Because cold wallets, such as those stored offline in a text file as I keep recommending in my standard advice below:
All you need is a text file to put your wallets in, like this example from https://walletgenerator.net/?currency=Dogecoin
1,"D7WBUpdgLRtG6WyPsqjhaKiJR65X8ZGnkZ","6KieLMW1poAzNVnmLuQZqA262gxEQ51eLGdDK8e2GL2B4LHCKKb" 2,"DM8LT16d49zHr8ByXbUwZb9UBXDGMaZRdc","6Ktgxdv6vN9v2bDHwcJBBb3oMRAgXJumESzBnxaXUSGFZoq6pWQ" 3,"D5UCa51AfxjtVHQ46oYXe2YfkctTeLXPhx","6L2WSPWadRYCwt2L1CxH6zC7PoTYY3KyjxdiUoCqi5eyq6hQKvj"
Use https://coinb.in/#settings to move coins. Download both sites and run them offline. Use https://bitinfocharts.com/dogecoin/ to check balances and transactions. See http://www.mocacinno.com/blog/create-sign-broadcast-transactions-using-coinb/ for coinb.in tutorial. And read the ELI5s (and my history) for more info.
Are without doubt THE SAFEST way to store your coins. Plus, they consume no resources. No bandwidth, no network stress for every node we have, no storage of 20Gb+ blockchains, no weeks of waiting for things to sync, no tearing your hair out and posting desperate pleas for help, and most importantly, no coins irretrievably lost because you or your client screwed up.

What?

Wallets, ALL WALLETS are nothing but numbers. Very large numbers, but fundamentally no different from “7”, “42”, “911” or a phone number. They cannot be created nor destroyed, and you either know them or you don’t. Anyone who knows a key can use it to spend any coins it controls. Anyone who doesn’t know it, can’t. Don’t be the guy who doesn’t know his own keys. Keep them safe. Make copies. Keep those safe. Don’t let your friends, kid brother or random burglar find them, but don’t lose them either.
The only other thing you need for a fully functional wallet is a way to spend coins. Coinb.in is such a way. There are others, such as DogeCoinMultiSig.org which tomcarbon built.
Oh, and you can and should download it and run it locally.

Where?

The default entry point for coinb.in is https://coinb.in/#settings because this settings page is very well hidden. Its in the tiny gear wheel on the Broadcast page.
Looking across the top of the page, you can see
  • + New
  • Verify
  • Sign
  • Broadcast
  • Wallet
  • About
We’re only going to use three of these. New, Sign, Broadcast.
Now, keep in mind that coinb.in is an old Bitcoin tool which tomcarbon added Dogecoin to. Sometimes it thinks its dealing with Bitcoin still, so if you see anything odd, go and make sure you’ve selected Dogecoin in the Settings page.

When?

This tool should be the only place you spend coins. Sure, some clients may look more convenient, but they all suffer from a very big coin-losing flaw. Whenever you split a UTXO, they create a new wallet to send the change to. And they DON’T TELL YOU! This means unless you back up after every transaction, you run a high risk of finding all your coins have ‘disappeared’ from your wallet, and you don’t recognise where they went.
So if you use a client for the convenience as well as a text list of your wallets, you won’t know to add a new wallet to your masterfile. Its best to ditch the clients entirely.

How?

Now we come to the nitty-gritty. Lets use those three wallets above and assume that #1 is the source, #2 the destination and #3 the change wallet. Note that these won’t actually work, as none of them have ever been used, but they will do as examples.
New Transaction
Located at the bottom of the New menu, this will give you a page to enter your wallets and amounts.
In the top field, you enter your source address or Key. If you use the key, it will calculate the address when you click the Load button, which should match what you expected. Note that Load only brings in the first 100 UTXOs. This is so that you can retrieve coins from high-volume wallets which would kill any client. Coinb.in is in fact the ONLY WAY to do this, as even QT falls over around 600 UTXOs.
You will see the total balance that was loaded in the Transaction Fee field. And also in the Inputs tab, where you can go to adjust which UTXOs to spend.
Now you need to add the wallet(s) and amounts to send to them. Lets suppose the source contained a single UTXO for 1,000 Doge. You want to send 500 of them. So you would enter the #2 address in the Address field, and 500 in the Amount field. The Fee now changes to 500, which is not what you want.
So you click the + button to bring up a new line, enter the change address and the other 500, making the fee zero.
And you’re done. Check that the Fee is indeed zero. Check that the amounts shown in the Outputs and Inputs tabs match exactly.

THIS IS CRITICAL!

There is a bug which will send all the coins to the miners if the Outputs exceed the Inputs. I would have expected the Fee to show as negative in such a situation, but it doesn’t. BE WARNED!
Once everything looks right, hit the Submit button.
This will give you a block of hex code. Copy it.
Sign
Go to the Sign tab and paste it. Add your private key for the source wallet and click Submit. Note this can be done offline for safety.
This will give you another block of hex, the SIGNED transaction.
Broadcast
Copy this and paste it in the Broadcast tab and click Submit.
That’s it. Your coins are on their way. Make a cuppa and settle in while they arrive in a minute or three.
Note: All fields retain their values unless you refresh the page! This can be a boon when doing multiple transactions, such as when emptying a huge wallet. But it can also be a trap for the unsuspecting. Refresh or close the window when you’re done.

Who?

Who should use this?
Absolutely EVERYONE!
Even if you’re wedded to your client in some satanic blood-contract, you should still know how this works, because sooner or later you’re going to have a problem you can’t fix without it.
Definitely download the site and store it on every device you have. On every USB backup of your wallets. On your phone (well, except iOS which doesn’t do local HTML), etc, etc, etc.
Oh, and if you’re a programmer SmartyShibe, do consider improving the code over on GitHub.
EDIT: https://github.com/OutCast3k/coinbin added courtesy of AtomHearth
submitted by Fulvio55 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

I just Chased him through a bitcoin tumbler, and when he Came out with 96,000 BTC, I was Waiting for Him...

I've been a very busy boy. All day, we've been chasing the scoundrel with our stolen bitcoins through the blockchain. Around lunchtime (UK), I was chasing him across the roof of a moving train, (metaphorically). I was less than 20 minutes, or 2 blockchain confirmations, behind "Tomas".
He was desperately creating new wallet addresses and moving his 49 retirement wallets through them, but having to wait for 3 or 4 confirmations each time before moving them again. Each time I caught up, I "666"ed him - sent 0.00666 bitcoins to mess up his lovely round numbers like 4,000. Then,all of a sudden, decimal places started appearing, and fractions of bitcoins were jumping from wallet to wallet like grasshoppers on a hotplate without stopping for confirmations.
Shit!
He was tumbling our stolen bitcoins a second time, and a tumbler is unbeatable....
Unless you guess which one it is, nearly all the coins belong to the person you're tracking, jump in with him, and get jumbled up through the same wallets using the same algorithm. I was hopping from foot to foot shouting "come on!" at my laptop, waiting an age for 6 blockchain confirmations to get 0.5 btc into "bitcoin fog". My half a bitcoin got sliced and diced through loads of wallets and I followed the biggest chunk with blockchain.info - along with 96,000 stolen ones!
I chose the shortest tumbling time - 6 hours - and my half a coin plinked back onto my android phone in dribs and drabs, sparkly and new.
I think he's asleep now in the czech republic. When he awakes, he will see my "666" next to his 96,000 stolen, freshly-laundered bitcoins. Along with lots of insults attached to fragments of bitcoins that I hope you are about to send here:-
https://blockchain.info/address/1CbR8da9YPZqXJJKm9ze1GYf67eKAUfXwP
Now I've GOT to sleep. I've just chased a thief through a washing machine for you
****EDIT 04/12/2013 the cash has moved continually for days,and I've been chasing it, pulling my trousers down,and depositing 0.000666 into each cash pile above about a million dollars i've found, any empty accounts that I think were important hubs,and a couple of 10 bitcoin "spending money" wallets he uses.
Here is the wallet that I've been chasing him with. Note the balance. He still hasn't given me my bitcoin! He's some kind of sucker for punishment. its cost him millions and uncovered the albion marketplace booty. The most expensive bitcoin in history.
https://blockchain.info/address/1AhYNAoMxDPD7bnNvxuSY9FB1CDviEuqzZ
Click the filter to select payments,then you only see my red arrows. Follow the ones that end in 666. You will find yourself standing in a cavernous wallet next to millions of dollars,with doors leading to others. ****17:20GMT,weds 4th Dec. He's siphoning it all through here:- https://blockchain.info/address/174psvzt77NgEC373xSZWm9gYXqz4sTJjn?filter=1
Its the input trough of a tumbler. If you follow the largest chunk,you catch up to "ZERO CONFIRMATIONS" eventually, but its not him.its a mincer / washing machine. If you do it at night, there is a recombined cash pot at the end of the rainbow. Or you can follow a chunk until it starts to get smaller quickly.Then do "taint analysis" and select "reverse taint". You are halfway through the tumbler, and "reverse taint" can see the output pots where the money has stopped moving.
(When you or I tumble a few bitcoin, it does a better job because it takes somebody else's 2 bitcoins from last week and sends them through as ours. But sheep has too many to do that). Listen to blockchain classics while you follow the money. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9n3XUUqFFk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFcL6nOjVo0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiLw45oAuD0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-AW_l_Wmbg
submitted by sheeproadreloaded2 to SheepMarketplace [link] [comments]

Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet 2.0 (HD) is out!!!

Mycelium 2.0 HD - Welcome to the future
Address reuse is not for me So I am waiting for HD For even greater satisfaction I want to label my transaction And then there is a third temptation Cold spend with zero confirmation That's why I beg you, please: Release! -- Jan Dreske (Mycelium Developer anxious to get this thing out to the public, who's birthday is today) 
Over the summer the Mycelium dev team has been working hard to make Mycelium 2.0 a reality. Our 200+ beta testers have given us great feedback and today, our biggest and most significant wallet update has finally been released for everyone.
Direct download: https://mycelium.com/bitcoinwallet On Google Play we use staged rollout, where it is released gradually over the next few days: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mycelium.wallet
New Features:
What does HD mean?
HD is short for Hierarchical Deterministic. Typically, bitcoin wallets generate each new bitcoin address from a unique random number, requiring a separate backup of each new address. To avoid losses from lack of backups, such wallets use a single bitcoin address for all your transactions. HD wallets instead use a “master seed” (a single large random number), to derive all future bitcoin addresses sequentially from that single seed. This means that you only need to make a backup once, and all the keys generated by an HD wallet can be restored at any time in the future just from that single master seed. HD wallets greatly improve your privacy by being able to keep generating new addresses. If you use the same address continuously all your transactions will be associated with a single address, and because all bitcoin transactions are public anyone can see what addresses you are sending funds to, and calculate your total balance. With an HD account new addresses are created whenever you send and receive funds, making your transaction activity and total balance very hard to track.
But I liked it the way it was! Will I have to change the way I use it?
All your keys, addresses and address book entries will be retained when you upgrade your app. The tab previously named “Keys” has been renamed to “Accounts.” Your old bitcoin addresses will become single address accounts, and you can continue to use them as before. We do advise that you switch to new HD accounts, though. You will also see your first empty HD account, which you can start using right away.
What about previous backups? Do my old ones still work?
Yes. You can still import keys and addresses you backed up with the previous version of Mycelium Wallet. However, we have removed the ability to create backups of single keys, or create new single addresses accounts. Instead, we advise you to backup your master seed and move your funds to the new HD wallet. As long as you keep your old backups, though, you will be able to recover your legacy accounts using Mycelium. To import a private key, switch to the “Accounts” tab, tap the icon with a key and plus symbol in the upper right corner, and select “Advanced”. Then scan your encrypted private key and enter the password.
Will I be able to continue to use my current Local Trader identity?
Yes. Your Local Trader identity will get carried over to the new version when upgrading along with your private keys.
How do I make a backup?
To create a backup, either tap the “Secure My Funds” button on the main page, or choose “backup” from the menu. You will be shown a list of words, one after the other. Write those words down with pen & paper. You then have to type in the words again, to make sure you got everything right. Store this word list in a safe place! Anybody who obtains this list can access current and future funds in your wallet! Note: The backup procedure only backs up your HD accounts. Your classic single address accounts are not part of this backup procedure.
How do I restore a backup?
If your phone is lost or damaged you can make a fresh install of the mycelium wallet on a different device. Upon startup, choose “Restore Backup”. Choose 12 as the length of your word list, and let the “password” checkbox unchecked, and proceed to enter your word list. This recreates your master seed and automatically creates and synchronizes your first HD account. It might take some time until your first account is synchronized and the balance updates. If you had more than one account, navigate to the “Accounts” tab, tap the button with a key icon and plus on the upper right corner, and choose “Add HD Account” to re-create your second account, etc. Note: This procedure only restores your HD accounts. To restore your classic accounts you have to manually import each key/address by going to the Accounts tab, click the + button, select Advanced, and then Import. If your previous Mycelium installation had a Local Trader account you can recreate your trader account and data by clicking “Buy/Sell Bitcoins”, select the “My Info” tab, click “Create” and select the account that your local trader identity was associated with.
Can I restore a BIP44 wallet created with other software?
Yes. When you start a fresh install of the app you get the option to restore a backup. You can choose between word lists lengths of 12, 18, or 24 words, and also supply an optional password in accordance with BIP39. This way you can restore all HD accounts generated by other wallets compatible with BIP44 and BIP39. For instance, this allows you to import your TREZOR word list in case your device was lost or damaged so you can quickly move your funds to safety.
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ELI5] Extracting Privkeys from QT/Core

We have a constant stream of people coming back after abandoning Dogecoin and the sub in 2014 when the price fell. These people all have old versions of QT and are now basically trying to recover their coins, presumably to cash out and abandon us again. This is causing strain for the network, as far more people are trying to leech blocks than seed them.
The thing is, none of this is necessary. Especially if you're just going to dump coins. With resources such as https://coinb.in/#settings all you need are your private keys, and you can create, sign and broadcast transactions yourself. No client required, let alone one as resource-hungry as QT.

"So, how do I get my keys?"

First of all, lets talk about data management. The overwhelming majority of coins are not lost through theft, especially direct theft of wallets (as distinct from wholesale thefts/scams/implosions like Moolah, GAW, MtGox, Cryptsy, and even our own beloved Dogetipbot). Most coins are lost because people forget about their wallets and do silly things like reformat hard drives, lose passwords and so on.
So, everyone should have a wallet list. Here is a sample bit of HTML that gives you a page with two columns of wallets, one for local wallets you would withdraw coins to, the other the third-party wallets you would deposit coins to third parties through (do note that many services use temporary addresses generated for deposits which expire after 24h or so). A page like this is how I manage my 100+ wallets, and I have copies on my network and hidden online. Such a page makes it easy to at least keep track of all your wallets, for a trivial amount of work to set up.
 
 Sample - Twitter Fr DFXXz9gq3WkgJaHn9tXRChMhFQcwm4Y251 To DByYgzd4ec5Ku9vPag8XqoBfyRpsoj8Xs3 @TipDoge Sample - Backslash Fr DSDyv83VC1QtEnmJ4ATKFn5Sw3iC12VLmX To D9MsxSyJe5Mq7fWFRpC7zQQt1gexHccN4w Backslash To DJ3GL68kw8vh99RvxnEmQKE8A3cWRoEEqo Backslash Faucet Sample - Block.io To DE5QamzWVnxK2HmCS61cUsrn9iwgTArunU Block.io 

"OK, great, so now I have a list of my wallets. Now what?"

Now you're going to need the private keys for each of those wallets. Obviously you're not going to store these in a public place though. So you will need a separate file, which can just be plain text. Copy each of those addresses into it.
Now go ahead and fire up QT. If you haven't synced it in 3 years, its going to take forever, but that doesn't matter. You don't actually need the blockchain for this, so you don't have to wait for it to catch up.
Open up the console which is in the Help menu. Then give the command dumpprivkey with the wallet address you want the key to. Then use the up-arrow key to bring that command back, replace the address with the next one, and keep going until you have them all.
It will look something like this:
 13:05:18 Welcome to the Dogecoin RPC console. Use up and down arrows to navigate history, and Ctrl-L to clear screen. Type help for an overview of available commands. 13:11:06 dumpprivkey D9xDcRthB6XP4vRGqiyKdDfVJ7CWhYuBBi 13:11:06 6KEcssuq1wWUrFVmMF8yDxHuAdQMiRezz53zDxADLmyoXnix7iM 13:12:00 dumpprivkey DUDARNrGHVTFcCgriwRWgDQJPKDuDQr9jg 13:12:00 6JNk6NNFZcr49fbsD2jcTfTxFLjJKq9DHQ5JU8CYeZ2Cz6JdKMY 13:12:25 dumpprivkey DG6xnwCT6BXePaySqU85XocobZmhbJczQH 13:12:25 6JNXFv95Mp9SzehHw9jojjdxHRNPeh77qCsRbaNwJZMp9MKCAu3 
Yes, those are real wallets. But don't bother trying to steal my coins, I just generated them on https://walletgenerator.net/ and they're empty.
That's basically it. All you need to do is add some descriptions of what the wallets are, pretty up the format to your liking, and save copies in multiple, secure places, including printed out.

Remember, if you lose your keys, OR someone else sees them, you lose your coins!

If those were my real wallets above, you could use the keys and spend my coins. So obviously, don't let anyone else, especially annoying little brothers, get their grubby hands on them. But also make sure they can be discovered if anything happens to you. That's why the printed copies... nobody is going to go trolling through your porn or warez collection on the offchance there's something valuable in there. But they will look in your safe or wherever you store other important documents. Just be sure to leave a note as to what they are and how to use them. Remember the woman who came here a couple years ago who had found a USB stick with 110 BTC in a locked wallet.dat on it from her dead husband? I sometimes wonder if she ever got the money. Don't be her. Or him.

"OK, great. Now I have my keys. What now?"

Well, you can spend coins using https://coinb.in/#settings from any wallet you have the keys to. First step is to choose the network. Dogecoin (mainnet) obviously. Then go to Transaction in the +New menu. Enter your address and hit the Load button. It will pull in the first 100 transactions. Now enter the address to pay, and the amount.
Note the Transaction Fee box!
You want this amount to be zero. Depending on whether you're moving coins to another of your wallets to consolidate them (a very good idea.. go read the UTXO ELI5, which you will find a couple pages into https://www.reddit.com/dogecoin/comments/4yts6h/start_here_for_much_wallet_wow/ - Yes, I'm going to make you work for it, cos there's tons of useful stuff there you need to know), or paying someone else, you may want to select which inputs to use.
Once you're happy with the transaction, go ahead and submit it. You will now get a block of text, which is the raw, unsigned transaction. Copy this. Go to the Sign tab. Paste it. Add your private key and Submit to sign it.
After a little bit, you will get a signed transaction. Copy it. Go to the Broadcast tab, paste it and hit Submit.
That's it. It should go into the next block in a minute or two. Yes, even without paying a mining fee. Our network is so lightly loaded that there are no contention issues like the Bitcoin people have to put up with.

"That's it? So why do I need QT?"

You don't. The process above is all that's involved in spending coins. Everything else is window dressing. So there is no need to run QT, or any other client. Oh, and since you can download the site and run it locally (mostly offline), there is no security issue beyond the usual keyloggers/spyware that can compromise anything. And by knowing how to do this, you are much better protected from accidental loss than someone who blindly trusts black boxes they don't understand.
Oh, one final thing... if you really want to help the network by seeding rather than leeching, go ahead and run a full node. Instructions are in that link above. AND you may want to help seed the bootstrap file torrent from a couple of days ago. Just because YOU don't need it, doesn't mean others don't, right?
submitted by Fulvio55 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

14 Things We Learned Creating a Million Dollar Hyperdeflationary Currency (DRAFT)

14 Things We Learned Creating a Million Dollar Hyperdeflationary Currency (DRAFT)
Four months ago we made a reddit post announcing a social experiment to create a “self-destructing currency” called BOMB. The reactions were polarizing, to say the least:
Some comments were positive
A currency that no one wants to spend but everyone wants to have would result in an ever growing value. However, it might only be on paper because no one wants to spend it. I wonder what will happen. I really hope this gains popularity, very interesting.
Many comments were negative
Aaand this is why crypto is viewed with such cynicism. People can literally create their own private currencies in their basements.
Multiple comments were entertaining
LOL, I wonder how many FBI safeguards this will trigger.
The success and legitimacy of the project were still to be determined, but one thing was for sure: people were curious.

The Big Bang


On January 15th, we launched one million BOMB into the digital abyss known as the blockchain. The rules of the currency were simple:
  • Only 1,000,000 BOMB would be created.
  • Each time the BOMB is transferred, 1% is destroyed
  • There would never be a newly created BOMB.
Over the following months, more than 750,000 tokens were distributed for free, over 3,000 individuals participated, and over 20,000 BOMB were burned through transfers and trading (2% of total supply). The social communities grew into the multiple thousands, and many respected projects began getting involved.
The intention was not to be used as a transactional currency, but rather a consistently deflating and decentralized store of value.
The problem we were attempting to solve (or at least experiment with) is the token velocity problem that plagues many of the tokens in the market today.
The goal was to become the deflationary currency of the decentralized world. Many currencies focus on speed, cost, and privacy. We focus on deflation.

https://preview.redd.it/da1yr3z2qf031.png?width=600&format=png&auto=webp&s=1cea93246a0ce9bb96dd63708371ba66512e8420

The Journey


The reaction of the events over the next months took us down a winding road of adventure and a fair share of heart attacks. One day we would get an endorphin rush after the co-creator of the #OccupyWallStreet movement wrote an article; the next day we would find a major vulnerability in the code that would literally cause us to re-issue tokens.
Through it all, the journey has been a rewarding one, and we learned a lot along the way. Here are the top 14 things we learned while creating a million dollar hyper deflationary currency.

1) A Deflationary Asset Can Survive... So Far At Least.


One of the biggest things we wanted to learn when starting the social experiment was to ask:
“Can a deflationary asset survive?”

Good question in theory, but how do you measure that? Do you measure it by price? Do you measure it by how many people hold it? Do you measure by usage?
Within the community, one of our members recently public a “The Bomb Report”, a case study breakdown of some really interesting statistics and analysis of the currency and the success/failures it has had so far.

Total Bombs Burned per Day


Total Bombs Burned Over Time


Price vs. Total Percentage Bomb Burned

2) If You Build it, They Won’t Come


The blockchain industry consists of some of the most talented technical and visionary minds in the world. However, despite this, most average consumers haven’t experienced a blockchain application or used the currencies built on top of it.
While there is still plenty of time for true mass adoption to occur, it has become clear that the amount of technical value being developed is not equating to the amount of activity or users.
We believe this is not for lack of building, but for lack of storytelling and communication. Average consumers don’t resonate with technological features, they resonate with the stories and the advantages within a solution.
Bitcoin, the most successful cryptocurrency to date, has one of the best stories behind it. An anonymous and mystical figure behind the name of Satoshi Nakamoto took his passion and pain from the financial crisis of 2008 to create a better solution.
The building behind BOMB wasn’t intensive or complex at all, just a few dozen lines of code in solidity. But that wasn’t our story. Our story was our journey and social experimentation of a deflationary currency. That is why people joined, and this is what keeps people intrigued still to this day.

3) Hodling is Still Alive & Kicking


Despite the average airdrop value sitting over $200 per participant, 84.5% of people have not touched or moved their BOMB. Out of 3073 current addresses, 2604 people would rather hold than sell their BOMB.

4) The Cryptocurrency Industry is Skeptical by Default


Despite giving away all our tokens for free and answering questions as transparently as possible, the default response was skepticism; and rightfully so.
Despite over $13,000,000,000 in public capital allocated to the decentralized world in the first half of 2018 alone, over 1000 projects are now dead. Many of the people who joined the industry joined during this time and still feel the resentment to this day.
While it will probably take many years to overcome this skepticism, and may never go away, we learned it is important to take every comment and negative remark in stride. Some are valid concerns, but a majority aren’t actually mad or disgruntled with you, but at the industry as a whole.

5) Going from 0 to 1 is 10x harder than 1 to 10


Like most projects, when we started, our followers and community count started at zero.
During the first few weeks of sharing the story of BOMB with a few friends, the growth was extremely slow (relative to what it is today) at maybe 1–5 people per day.
Nobody wants to be the first to the party. When you’re walking down the street, everyone assumes the crowded bar is better than the empty bar. The one thing you can do to overcome this early stage is making your early adopters feel like absolute VIPs.
More than the early adopters getting more free tokens than everyone else, myself and the co-creators spent endless hours on telegram talking with each and every single person who joined. There was not a lost soul who wandered into our group that didn’t get an overly ambitious introduction.
This is the core and foundation that will set everything in motion. While I no longer introduce myself to every new person to the group, our community does, and its an amazing feeling.

6) Clear & Concise Communication is Everything


When I first started telling my friends about BOMB, the natural response was “What else does it do?”
We as humans have a natural instinct to think more is better. Many founders start with a very clear mission to create something like a comfortable chair but they end up explaining their product as an “Anti-Gravitational Sitting Apparatus to Disrupt the Entire Furniture Industry with Built-in LED Lights and Omni-Rocking Functionality”
The problem is when we try to communicate this vision to the world, our vision becomes convoluted and messy. The most successful projects to date consist of the ones doing one thing better than anyone else.
When people explain what BOMB is, they explain it very clearly and concisely: A deflationary currency. When people explain how BOMB works, they easily recall and reference the three rules of the currency as stated above.

7) Transparently Bad News is Better than No News


The biggest “OH SNAP” moment for BOMB occurred in February, just a few weeks after airdropping our creation to the world. A community member following the project found an error on the code that could open up the currency to exploitation in the future.
Rather than attempting to hide the situation, we made a medium post to explain the situation and news to the community.
Just a few weeks ago, many of our community members began to get anxious about a potential exchange listing that was taking longer than expected. While frustrating to take criticism for items we couldn’t control, we wrote a 19 thread tweet storm titled “Transparency Update”. Despite the negative news, the community loved it and felt closer to the project than ever.
People many times don’t mind what happened, as long as they understand why you did it, and the reasoning behind it. Yes, there will always be that 10% that won’t accept your answer. But the people who truly care about your vision and value will stick with you. Those are the people who matter.

8) You Don’t Need to Spend $25,000 on an Exchange


Getting on an exchange after raising zero capital was definitely hard. We made a commitment early on that we would never ask our community for money, so everything we did had to be extremely scrappy and resourceful.
To help get us off the ground, a few of our early members kept talking about a community/technology called ParJar. In short, this was a telegram bot we could implement that allowed our community to openly trade BOMB instantly and feeless whenever they wanted.
There are a lot of items that helped us build our community, but we believe ParJar gave us more native engagement than any other campaign we have done. This organic incentivization ecosystem for individuals to exchange assets was and continues to be the backbone and foundation for our growth.

9) Not All Exchanges Are Created Equal


Even at the peak of the bear market, exchanges attempted to charge anywhere between $20,000 and $250,000; and those were the low-level ones. We definitely couldn’t afford this.
After doing more research, we narrowed down our goals with exchanges and what we were trying to accomplish. While many projects immediately want to get on the “bigger volume” markets, research showed there were only a handful of exchanges that had real volume. The rest were doing a lot of wash trading.
Instead of going after the top level exchanges, we focused on connecting with other respected and up-and-coming exchanges that would be willing to work with us on integration. The deflationary features inside our contract make us incompatible with many exchanges. This was a full-time job in itself.
After many months of searching, we were able to really connect with the team at DDEX (an exchange that is venture backed by reddit’s co-founder) that saw the potential in BOMB and took a chance on us.

10) Liquidity Premium is a Real Thing


While I have heard the term ‘Liquidity Premium’ before, I didn’t quite know how this would impact a deflationary currency. In short, a liquidity premium occurs when something costs more/less because it has high/low liquidity.
The best way for me to think of this is a house. Although houses are valuable, they many times take months to be sold or liquidated for cash. Because of this, prices can be up to 20–30% lower than it would be if it were liquid.
In relation to BOMB, our goal from the beginning was to decrease token velocity as much as possible. The side effect of this was low liquidity.
As soon as we reached Mercatox (a centralized exchange that didn’t burn the tokens) BOMB value increased by nearly 25–50% overnight.
Of course, we can probably attribute some of this to new eyeballs and demand, but it has been interesting to watch the arbitrage between a DEX (burns BOMB) and a CEX (doesn’t burn BOMB).

Price After Mercatox Listing


11) The Market Decides Value, Not the Founders


One of the biggest questions we got in the early days was:
How much are BOMB worth?
When we explained that the tokens were being given away for free, many equated this to no value.
In traditional coins or tokens, the value is determined (or at least decided) by the founders at the price they are willing to sell them at. If XYZ project decides to launch an ICO and sell them at $1, that is the given “value” of the token.
The problem with this premise is that this initial value is completely arbitrary and theoretical until it can be actively traded. I can attempt to sell my car for $250,000, but if the market will only pay me $250, that’s what its worth.
If we learned one thing from the 2018 bear market, its that the founder’s of projects are very bad at knowing the intrinsic value of their own tokens; many times 90–99% off.
Rather than giving our token an arbitrary number, we gave every single token away for free and let the world decide its value.

12) Capital is a Luxury, Not a Necessity


In the startup world, people many times reference the Lean Startup approach. The premise is pretty simple, get your idea into the world for as little amount of money as possible, and see if the world is willing to give it value. In the cryptocurrency world, everything seems to be backward.
Cryptocurrencies spend months planning an ICO, then another few years developing a project, only to find out if their idea is worth building. Millions of dollars are spent on the building before confirming the demand.
IF you truly believe you have an idea that people want or need, and IF you are willing/able to build an MVP first, and IF you want to build a community fueled project; give a portion away for free and let the market decide your fate.
Then, if the market gives it a thumbs up, you have some liquid capital to build your grand vision; all while raising zero capital.

13) Code is Replicable, Community is Not


One mission of BOMB from the beginning was to hopefully provide a financial case study for other people to learn from and implement into their own tokenomic structure.
We anticipated and expected others to do this. But, what we did not expect is the number of exact copy cats that would arise of the first weeks. At this time on Etherscan, there are more than five other replicas of BOMB that people created.
While we were originally discouraged at others attempting to directly imitate our project, we quickly learned that what made BOMB special was no the code, but the community of people around what we were creating.
You can copy code, but you can’t copy a community.

14) People Who Truly Believe in Something Will Go Above and Beyond


To this day, we haven’t paid anything beyond a few #BombUp rewards to our community. And yet, they do some of the most creative, amazing, and impressive creations we could have ever asked for.

Report: An in-depth financial and data-driven report on BOMB explosions, price, and analytics trends.
Art: Everything from designs to stickers for the community to use and play with.
Bomb Up: A community member-run group that gives away BOMB every day for playing telegram games.
Articles: Some of the most passionate people writing in-depth articles about the project.
Languages: Alternative languages that wanted to discuss BOMB in Russian and German.

Conclusion


There is no doubt that to some, BOMB will be nothing more than a meme coin, and we are okay with that.
One of the most fascinating parts of this experiment has been watching our original meaning, goal, and vision of BOMB change and evolve for other people over time. Instead of attempting to control the dialogue, we let the community interpret the project in whatever way they want.
This individual empowerment has truly given the currency a life of its own and the amount of fun, insight, and overall awesome people we have been able to connect within our short lifespan has been nothing short of amazing.
At the current rate of deflation, if the current pace stays constant the last BOMB is expected o be destroyed by 2031.

BombLytics Bot

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Episode #474 Blockchain Wallet Woes: The Saga Continues

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